al-Tamimi: Iraqi Kurdistan’s Crisis: A Failure of Strategy

al-Tamimi: Iraqi Kurdistan’s Crisis: A Failure of Strategy

by Aymenn Jawad al-Tamimi
Middle East Forum (MEForum) Research & Writing
The American Spectator
October 22, 2017

As the war against the Islamic State as an entity controlling territory comes to a close in Iraq, control over territories disputed between the Iraqi central government and the Iraqi Kurdistan regional government (KRG) has come to the forefront. Forces officially affiliated with the Baghdad government, as well as militias aligned with it on this issue, have taken control of several key disputed sites, including Kirkuk city and Sinjar, which were previously held by Kurdish forces.

Request Interviews Here.
""
1
TruthPR's Top Tier Guests - Interview Request Form

You can always email or call: 

Jackie@TruthPR.com or call 662-259-0988.

In a hurry: Write us a quick note!
0 /
Date of Interview
Time Requested:>> Eastern Time Please
0 /
Interview Length
Interview Topic/Angle
Show / Host Name
Call In Phone Number
Contact (Booker/Scheduler)
Tell us about your show
Previous
Next

While it initially seemed that the aim of the operations was just to assert the boundaries that existed prior to the Islamic State surge of 2014, there are indications the rollback may go as far as the 2003 boundaries. What is the root of this crisis? And what, if anything, should be the U.S. role?

Inevitably, much commentary has taken on a moralistic tone, lamenting a supposed U.S. abandonment of the Kurds to the Iranians and their clients, or getting into arguments about whether places like Kirkuk are actually Kurdish. The issue at hand, though, is not so much right or wrong over who should control which area as strategic failure. (Read More)

 

By | 2017-11-01T11:59:40+00:00 November 1st, 2017|Articles, ISIS, Middle East, Op-Ed|

About the Author:

Gregg Roman functions as the chief operations officer for the Forum, responsible for day-to-day management, communications, and financial resource development. Mr. Roman previously served as director of the Community Relations Council of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh. In 2014, he was named one of the ten most inspiring global Jewish leaders by the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. He previously served as the political advisor to the deputy foreign minister of Israel and worked for the Israeli Ministry of Defense. Mr. Roman is a frequent speaker at venues around the world, often appears on television, and has written for the Hill, the Forward, the Albany Times-Union, and other publications. He attended American University in Washington, D.C., and the Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) in Herzliya, Israel, where he studied national security studies and political communications.